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Reports on Plans and Priorities 2016-17

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Industry, 2015

Cat. No. CR1-5E-PDF

ISSN 2292-5104

This document is available in alternative formats on request.

PDF document


Table of Contents

Ministers’ Message

President’s Message

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Appendix: Definitions

Ministers’ Message

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As Canada begins a new chapter in 2016–17, creating a culture of innovation is more important than ever in driving economic growth.

The recent name change of our Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio recognizes this, placing a deliberate emphasis both on innovation and scientific discovery, and their equal importance for economic development nationally and throughout all of Canada’s diverse regions.

We have promised Canadians a government that will bring real change—in both what we do and how we do it. We will invest in growing our economy, increase transparency and use the best evidence available to inform decision making.

Through the programs of the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio, we will work to develop and deliver an innovation agenda for Canada that will help improve our productivity performance, grow the economy and enhance our prosperity and well-being.

This 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) provides information on how SSHRC will support the Government on achieving our agenda in the coming year and we are fully confident that SSHRC is prepared to successfully support us and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year’s report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government’s progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council’s reports to Parliament will focus more transparently on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow our Council’s progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister’s mandate letters to us.

It is our pleasure to present the Report on Plans and Priorities for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for 2016–17, which sets out how the Council’s work will contribute to attaining these shared objectives.

The Honourable Navdeep Bains Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development
Honourable Navdeep Bains Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development
The Honourable Kirsty Duncan Minister of Science

The Honourable
Kirsty Duncan
Minister of Science

The Honourable Bardish Chagger Minister of Small Business and Tourism

The Honourable
Bardish Chagger
Minister of Small Business and Tourism

President’s Message

Ted Hewitt, President, SSHRC

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) is one of Canada’s—and the world’s—leading research funding bodies. Through its comprehensive, streamlined programming, SSHRC funds Canada’s best, brightest and most promising students, researchers and research institutions.

This year, SSHRC is preparing to launch its 2016–20 strategic plan. Our new plan will help guide the efforts of our skilled and dedicated staff in support of knowledge generation and impact in the social sciences and humanities, reflecting our mandate in support of research, scholarship and training in Canada.

As in the past, SSHRC will continue to put Canada at the forefront of research excellence, supporting fundamental, investigator-driven research with impact, developing highly skilled talent and fostering greater collaboration among postsecondary institutions, businesses, governments and communities, and mobilizing knowledge to better connect research to Canadians.

It is my pleasure to present the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities, which details how SSHRC is helping Canada address the challenges of the future, through its leadership as a supporter of social sciences and humanities research and research training.

Ted Hewitt, PhD


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Ministers:
The Honourable Navdeep Bains, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Science

The Honourable Bardish Chagger, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Institutional Head: Ted Hewitt, President

Ministerial Portfolio: Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Enabling Instruments: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. S-12

Year of Incorporation/Commencement: 1977

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) funds research and research training that builds knowledge about people, past and present, with a view toward creating a better future. From questions of family and culture to concerns about jobs and employment, research about people—how we live, what we think, how we act—informs new knowledge and insights on the issues that matter most to Canadians.

SSHRC plays a unique role within Canada’s science, technology and innovation system by awarding grants and scholarships to researchers, students and fellows who work as individuals, in small groups and in formal partnerships with partners from all sectors to develop talent, generate insights and build connections that address the needs of all sectors of society.

Responsibilities

SSHRC is an agency that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. It was created through an act of Parliament in 1977 and mandated to:

  • promote and assist research and scholarship in the social sciences and humanities; and
  • advise the Minister in respect of such matters relating to such research as the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration.

To fulfil its mandate, SSHRC offers funding opportunities that provide support to Canadian researchers and students through grants, scholarships and fellowships, respecting the terms of the federal Policy on Transfer Payments. SSHRC is also responsible for administering the following tri-agency programs, offered jointly with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR):

  • the Canada Research Chairs Program;
  • the Canada Excellence Research Chairs Program;
  • the Research Support Fund; and
  • the Canada First Research Excellence Fund.

In addition, SSHRC works with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, as well as with NSERC and CIHR, to support Networks of Centres of Excellence initiatives. It collaborates with NSERC and CIHR to deliver the Canada Graduate Scholarships, Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships, and Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships programs. SSHRC and CIHR also participate in the College and Community Innovation Program, managed by NSERC. SSHRC will continue to foster this collaboration to the benefit of all Canadians by building on the harmonization of tri-agency programs, practices and policies.

The president of SSHRC is supported by a governing council appointed by order-in-council to reflect the perspectives of the academic, public and private sectors. SSHRC’s governing council promotes and assists research and scholarship in the social sciences and humanities. It meets regularly to set strategic policy and program priorities, allocate budgets, and advise the Minister and Parliament on matters related to research in these areas.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

1. Strategic Outcome: Canada is a world leader in social sciences and humanities research and research training.

  • 1.1 Program: Talent: attraction, retention and development of students and researchers in the social sciences and humanities
    • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Canada Research Chairs
    • 1.1.2 Sub-program: Canada Graduate Scholarships
    • 1.1.3 Sub-program: Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships
    • 1.1.4 Sub-program: Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships
    • 1.1.5 Sub-program: Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships
  • 1.2 Program: Insight: new knowledge in the social sciences and humanities
    • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Individual, team and partnership research grants
    • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Institutional research capacity grants
  • 1.3 Program: Connection: mobilization of social sciences and humanities knowledge
    • 1.3.1 Sub-program: Individual, team and partnership knowledge mobilization grants
    • 1.3.2 Sub-program: Research-based knowledge culture
    • 1.3.3 Sub-program: Networks of Centres of Excellence

2. Strategic Outcome: Canada has the institutional capacity to enable research and research-related activities in social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering and health.

  • 2.1 Program: Indirect costs of research
  • 2.2 Program: Canada First Research Excellence Fund

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority: Enable excellence in a changing research landscape

Description
Through grants, fellowships and scholarships, SSHRC helps Canada’s researchers and research institutions do what they do best: train the next generation of talented, creative thinkers and doers; build knowledge and understanding about people, cultures and societies; and drive the innovations that address the most pressing challenges of today and tomorrow. SSHRC’s role is to recognize and facilitate research excellence—quality and impact—working in collaboration with postsecondary institutions, scholarly associations and other organizations.

Priority Type 1
New

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

 

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Once the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management is approved, promote readiness for data management within the research community and identify and implement an approach to renewed data management requirements for grantees.*

April 2016

To be determined

Strategic Outcome 1
Facilitate the development of a new grants management system by streamlining and harmonizing business processes and replacing aging technologies to provide program delivery services in the most cost-effective manner and to optimize the user experience. April 2016

To be determined

Strategic Outcome 1
Plan for the establishment of new chairs in sustainable technologies** April 2016

To be determined

Program 1.1

* This planned initiative is directly linked to one of the priorities highlighted in the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development mandate letter.

** This planned initiative is directly linked to one of the priorities highlighted in the Minister of Science mandate letter.

Priority: Create opportunities for research and training through collaborative initiatives

Description
Joint initiatives offer multiple benefits to the research enterprise. They bring together funders and other stakeholders, facilitating the pooling of resources and attracting new sources of funding for all types and modes of research. They benefit the creation of new knowledge. Joint initiatives encourage researchers to collaborate across disciplinary, geographic and sectoral boundaries. They enable new types of research, training and knowledge mobilization by bringing diverse perspectives to bear in the research process. They contribute to a dynamic training environment, preparing students to succeed within and beyond academia.

Priority Type
New

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Review SSHRC’s approach to collaborations with other organizations with a view to creating new opportunities for researchers to participate in international, interdisciplinary and/or cross-sectoral research partnerships, and to leveraging new resources for research, talent development and knowledge mobilization.

April 2016

March 2017

Strategic Outcome 1

Priority: Connect social sciences and humanities research with Canadians

Description
How will a changing climate affect Canada’s coastal regions and northern communities? Which kinds of infrastructural investments offer the greatest benefit to future generations? How are the experiences and aspirations of Aboriginal Peoples essential to building a successful shared future? SSHRC-funded research explores these and other critical questions facing all Canadians. SSHRC is committed to ensuring that the benefits of research and talent development are fully realized. SSHRC must support greater opportunities for the research it funds to be more accessible to Canadian organizations in all sectors, to contribute to decision-making and innovation, and to address the challenges of today and tomorrow.

Priority Type
New

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Continue to encourage and promote research, talent development and mobilization of knowledge with the goal of contributing new insights and understanding for future challenge areas. Collaborate with the academic, public, private and not-for-profit sectors through a variety of activities, including undertaking outreach and engagement initiatives (e.g., convening experts and stakeholders on relevant topics), overseeing knowledge synthesis grants competitions and widely distributing the results.

April 2016

To be determined

Strategic Outcome 1

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Ministers’ mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Legacy systems: The suite of SSHRC legacy applications may not be able to continue to support existing and new SSHRC grants management processes due to their aging software and database systems. SSHRC will establish an information technology portfolio management system to make decisions on the strategic investments required in the legacy systems suite. SSHRC will also identify gaps between legacy application capabilities and business requirements. Strategic Outcomes 1 and 2
Research Portal: The organization might not be able to effectively manage this bi-agency initiative due to its high degree of complexity in integrating more than 70 funding opportunities with different business processes, business rules and data structures SSHRC, working closely with NSERC, will develop key project documents, such as a project charter and detailed project management plan, to ensure the successful integration of all funding opportunities. Strategic Outcome 1 and 2
Stakeholder relations: The organization might not effectively manage diverse stakeholder relationships and challenges to its reputation. SSHRC will plan and facilitate the migration of its external facing website content to the Canada.ca site and prepare a communications plan, both internal and external, to manage stakeholder relations as a result of this mandated initiative.

SSHRC will hold two major symposia on future challenge areas to attract academic, business, and public and private sector leaders.

Strategic Outcomes 1 and 2

Through the review of the Corporate Risk Profile in fall 2015, SSHRC management deemed these three risks to fall outside its risk tolerance threshold, and to require dedicated resources and more rigorous monitoring and follow-up.

SSHRC administers a significant budget—roughly $380 million for SSHRC programs and $342 million for the Research Support Fund. Despite the size of this budget, the overall level of risk to the organization is low in terms of continuity of government operations, the maintenance of services to and protection of interests of the Canadian public, and the safety and security of the Canadian public.

SSHRC has adopted an integrated risk management framework, which provides a comprehensive view of corporate risks, and assigns responsibility for their management. The approach is part of SSHRC’s annual planning cycle, which integrates priority-setting, resource allocation and risk management. This approach aligns with the Treasury Board’s Framework for the Management of Risk. As part of its annual planning cycle, SSHRC reviewed and updated its Corporate Risk Profile and Corporate Risk Management Framework in 2015–16, to ensure that each risk would be systematically monitored by senior management. The framework integrates the results of the Corporate Risk Profile, while identifying triggers, controls and risk response strategies for each risk. It also outlines processes and expectations for the ongoing monitoring and reporting of risks within SSHRC’s integrated planning cycle.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$720,012,809 $720,012,809 $716,252,068 $710,207,968

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
221 221 221

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)
Strategic
Outcomes,
Programs
and Internal Services
2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome 1
Talent $170,656,178 $168,129,181 $173,090,879 $173,493,111 $173,493,111 $173,415,937 $173,415,937
Insight $143,601,012 $154,341,344 $158,025,332 $159,789,803 $159,789,803 $157,751,114 $154,451,114
Connection $34,556,118 $33,309,316 $31,290,851 $28,590,819 $28,590,819 $27,355,833 $24,611,733
Subtotal $348,813,308 $355,779,841 $362,407,062 $361,873,733 $361,873,733 $358,522,884 $352,478,784
Strategic Outcome 2
Indirect costs
of research
$331,845,665 $340,902,057 $340,723,429 $341,615,386 $341,615,386 $341,611,587 $341,611,587
Canada First Research Excellence Fund $0 $0 $1,912,757 $2,494,438 $2,494,438 $2,484,435 $2,484,435
Subtotal $331,845,665 $340,902,057 $342,636,186 $344,109,824 $344,109,824 $344,096,022 $344,096,022
Internal
services
subtotal
$15,060,465 $16,244,750 $16,010,513 $14,029,252 $14,029,252 $13,633,162 $13,633,162
Total $695,719,438 $712,926,648 $721,053,761 $720,012,809 $720,012,809 $716,252,068 $710,207,968

Remarque : il est possible que le total des colonnes ne soit pas exact en raison de décimales cachées.

For the 2016–17 fiscal year, SSHRC plans to spend roughly $378.4 million for SSHRC programs (including Internal Services) and $341.6 million for the Research Support Fund (under Indirect costs of research), for a total of $720.0 million, to meet the expected results of its programs and to contribute to its strategic outcomes. Changes in year-to-year spending reflect variations in funding for the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research program, which is dependent on the results of the merit review process for competitions held yearly, and temporary funding for the three-year pilot Community and College Social Innovation Fund.

The Canada First Research Excellence Fund was launched in December 2014. Payments are expected to be made in 2015–16. The actual amount of funding will depend on the results of the merit review process. The required funding was sought through the 2015–16 supplementary estimates process.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic
Outcome
Program Spending Area Government of
Canada Outcome
2015-16
Planned Spending
1. Canada is a world leader
in social sciences and humanities research and research training
1.1 Talent: attraction, retention and development of students and researchers in the social sciences and humanities Economic Affairs An innovative and
knowledge-based economy
$173,493,111
1.2 Insight: new knowledge in the social sciences and humanities Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy $159,789,803
1.3 Connection: mobilization of social sciences and humanities knowledge Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy $28,590,819
2. Canada has the institutional
capacity to enable research and research-related activities in social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering and health
2.1 Indirect costs of research Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy $341,615,386
2.2 Canada First Research Excellence Fund Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy $2,494,438

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic affairs $705,983,557
Social affairs N/A
International affairs N/A
Government affairs N/A

Note: While SSHRC funding spans multiple categories, it primarily falls under the spending area of Economic affairs, as per official Treasury Board guidelines.

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend
Description of figure

Description of SSHRC expenditures from 2013-14 to 2018-19: Departmental Spending Trend Graph—SSHRC (excluding the Research Support Fund)

This bar graph shows the spending trend for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), in millions of dollars, for fiscal years 2013-14 to 2018-19. It does not include spending on the Research Support Fund, formerly known as the Indirect Costs Program.

The y-axis shows dollar values. The scale begins at zero and goes to 400 million dollars, in increments of 50 million.

The six bars each represent a fiscal year: 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19.

Each bar shows the spending broken down by statutory, voted and anticipated sunset program funding. Only fiscal years 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 include spending on anticipated sunset programs.

SSHRC’s spending (minus the Research Support Fund), by fiscal year, is as follows:

  • 2013-14: 364 million dollars, broken down by 3 million in statutory funding and 361 million in voted funding
  • 2014-15: 372 million dollars, broken down by 3 million in statutory funding and 369 million in voted funding
  • 2015-16: 380 million dollars, broken down by 5 million in anticipated sunset programs, 3 million in statutory funding and 372 million in voted funding.
  • 2016-17: 378 million dollars, broken down by 5 million in anticipated sunset programs, 3 million in statutory funding and 370 million in voted funding
  • 2017-18: 374 million dollars, broken down by 3 million in anticipated sunset programs, 3 million in statutory funding and 368 million in voted funding
  • 2018-19: 368 million dollars, broken down by 3 million in statutory funding and 365 million in voted funding
Departmental Spending Trend
Description of figure

Description of SSHRC expenditures related to the Research Support Fund from 2013-14 to 2018-19: Departmental Spending Trend Graph—Research Support Fund

This bar graph shows the spending trend for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), in millions of dollars, for fiscal years 2013-14 to 2018-19 for the Research Support Fund, formerly known as the Indirect Costs Program.

The y-axis shows dollar values. The scale begins at zero and goes to 400 million dollars, in increments of 50 million.

The six bars each represent a fiscal year: 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19.

All funding is voted funding; neither anticipated sunset programs nor statutory funding apply to the Research Support Fund.

SSHRC’s spending for the Research Support Fund, by fiscal year, is as follows:

  • 2013-14: 332 million dollars in voted funding
  • 2014-15: 341 million dollars in voted funding
  • 2015-16: 341 million dollars in voted funding
  • 2016-17: 342 million dollars in voted funding
  • 2017-18: 342 million dollars in voted funding
  • 2018-19: 342 million dollars in voted funding

The preceding graphs illustrate SSHRC’s actual and planned expenditures from 2013–14 to 2018–19. For the 2016–17 fiscal year, SSHRC plans to spend approximately $378.4 million for SSHRC programs and $341.6 million for the Research Support Fund, for a total of $720.0 million, to meet the expected results of its programs and to contribute to its strategic outcomes.

In the graphs, spending for 2013–14 and 2014–15 represents the total authorities disbursed as reflected in the Public Accounts of Canada. For 2015–16, the forecast spending amounts indicated on the graphs include all parliamentary appropriations: main estimates, supplementary estimates and carry-forward. For 2016–17 to 2018–19, planned spending consists of the figures listed in the 2016–17 Annual Reference Level Update.

Spending is forecasted to increase in 2015–16. SSHRC received $7 million in ongoing funding to support advanced research in the social sciences and the humanities through the Insight Program and $9 million in ongoing funding for the Research Support Fund. In addition, temporary funding was allotted for a pilot project in social innovation, which will sunset in 2017–18.

Estimates by Vote

For information on SSHRC’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Canada is a world leader in social sciences and humanities research and research training

Program 1.1: Talent: attraction, retention and development of students and researchers in the social sciences and humanities

Description
This program provides support to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the form of fellowships, and to research chairs in postsecondary institutions that cover salary and research funding. This program is key in attracting, retaining and developing talent in the social sciences and humanities; to cultivating leaders within academia and across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors; and to building centres of world-class research excellence at Canadian postsecondary institutions. The program brands Canada as a top destination for research and research training.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$173,493,111 $173,493,111 $173,415,937 $173,415,937

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
45 45 45

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
SSHRC-funded scholarship and fellowship recipients are employed in Canada and internationally Employment rates (in percentage) of SSHRC-funded doctoral students 85 Currently met; to be maintained
Employment rates (in percentage) of SSHRC-funded postdoctoral researchers 90 Currently met; to be maintained
Canada builds research excellence and research capacity Percentage of SSHRC Canada Research Chairs researchers that report having been nominated for, or received, a national or international prize or award 10 December 2018

Planning Highlights

  • Canada Excellence Research Chairs competition: Launch the new competition and administer the adjudication of Phase 1 applications in 2016–17.
  • Harmonization of post-award policies and development of award holder guides for scholarships and fellowships: Work with NSERC and CIHR, the lead on this initiative, to implement harmonized policies and guidelines related to the management of awards and scholarships by students, postdoctoral researchers and institutions.

Sub-program 1.1.1: Canada Research Chairs

Description

This program provides support to research chairs in the form of salary and research funding, to attract and retain talent in the social sciences and humanities. National and international researchers can be chairholders. This program is necessary in order to strengthen research excellence, improve research training of highly qualified personnel, improve universities’ capacity to generate and apply new knowledge, and promote the best possible use of research resources through strategic institutional planning and collaboration among institutions and between sectors. Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs have a value of $200,000 per year, and Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs have a value of $100,000 per year. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$56,023,226 $55,999,631 $55,999,631

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
14 14 14

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Be Achieved
World-class research is enhanced in Canadian universities through the attraction, retention and support of excellent researchers Percentage of institutions that found the Canada Research Chairs program important or very important in their ability to support the existing research teams/ research clusters/ research centres 90 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Follow-up to Canada Research Chairs Program evaluation: Work with CIHR and NSERC to address the recommendations from the 15th-year evaluation of the program.

Sub-program 1.1.2: Canada Graduate Scholarships

Description

This program provides scholarships to Canadian master’s and doctoral students in the social sciences and humanities who demonstrate a high standard of achievement in their undergraduate and graduate studies. The program is necessary in order for graduate students to develop the research skills needed to become highly qualified personnel and research leaders of the future. Scholarships are tenable only at eligible Canadian universities; master’s scholarships are worth $17,500 (one payment for 12 months) and doctoral scholarships $35,000 per year (for 36 months). This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Canada Graduate Scholarships.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$70,435,244 $70,409,256 $70,409,256

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
15 15 15

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
A supply of highly qualified personnel to the academic, public, not-for-profit and private sectors Percentage of Canada Graduate Scholarship students supported completing their degree 90 March 2017
Years to degree completion of doctoral recipients of a Canada Graduate Scholarship <6 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Harmonization of the Canada Graduate Scholarships program: Continue to work with CIHR and NSERC to harmonize the program following the evaluation of the Canada Graduate Scholarships program and the management response.

Sub-program 1.1.3: Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships

Description

This program provides scholarships to doctoral students in the social sciences and humanities who demonstrate an exceptionally high standard of achievement and leadership potential. This program is necessary to attract outstanding doctoral students from abroad, and to retain top Canadian doctoral students, to help build world-class research capacity. The program brands Canada as a venue for excellent research, and encourages scholarship recipients to stay and lead the next generation of researchers in Canada. Canadian and international students are eligible to be nominated for a Vanier scholarship, which is valued at $50,000 per year for three years, offering a value and prestige comparable to other internationally recognized scholarship programs. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$8,417,240 $8,415,139 $8,415,139

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
1 1 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
A supply of world-class doctoral students to build research capacity in Canada Percentage of applicants considered worthy of award by expert reviewers for a given competition year  40 March 2017
Number of international students who were awarded a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship 20 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships management response: Continue to implement the management response to the evaluation of Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships program.

Sub-program 1.1.4: Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships

Description

This program provides fellowships to top-tier postdoctoral researchers in the social sciences and humanities from Canada and around the world, enabling them to pursue research opportunities at Canadian postsecondary institutions. A limited number of fellowships are also awarded to top-ranking individuals who have completed a PhD in Canada, to pursue research opportunities at foreign institutions. These prestigious two-year fellowships, valued at $70,000 per year, aim to reinforce Canada’s standing as a global player in research, and as a destination of choice for promising researchers at an early stage in their careers. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$3,383,906 $3,381,805 $3,381,805

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
1 1 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
A supply of world-class postdoctoral researchers to build research capacity in Canada Percentage of applicants considered worthy of award by expert reviewers for a given competition year  25 March 2017
Number of international students who were awarded a Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship 8 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships management response: Continue to implement the management response to the evaluation of the Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships.

Sub-program 1.1.5: Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships

Description

This program provides fellowships to doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers with a demonstrated record of achievement in their studies and research skills. This program is necessary to support the training of highly qualified personnel, develop and retain the best and most promising research talent in the social sciences and humanities, and expand the research qualifications of emerging scholars of the highest potential at an important time in their research careers. Doctoral Fellowships are valued at $20,000 per year for between 12 and 48 months, and are tenable at any recognized university in Canada or abroad. Postdoctoral Fellowships are valued at $38,000 per year for 12 or 24 months, and are tenable at Canadian or foreign universities and research institutions, and provide stipendiary support to nontenured PhD graduates to undertake new research, publish research findings, develop and expand personal research networks, broaden teaching experiences, and become competitive in national research competitions. Doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers who choose to take their fellowships abroad benefit from the opportunity to expand their knowledge and build the international linkages necessary to ensure success in the globalized 21st century. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$35,233,496 $35,210,105 $35,210,105

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
14 14 14

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Awardees disseminate research findings in Canada and abroad Percentage of awardees who report disseminating research findings beyond dissertation 95 December 2017
Awardees enhance their research and research-related skills, including through opportunities to gain international experience Percentage indicating “above average” quality level of the overall research experience (≥4 on a 5-point scale) 85 December 2017
Percentage of SSHRC doctoral awardees who study or conduct research abroad 50 December 2017
Percentage of SSHRC postdoctoral awardees who study or conduct research abroad 60 December 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Joint initiative to support social sciences and humanities postdoctoral research and related activities pertaining to international law and governance: Launch and implement a joint initiative with the Centre for International Governance Innovation to provide additional support to postdoctoral researchers working in areas related to international law and governance.
  • SSHRC Doctoral Fellowships management response: Implement the management response to the evaluation of the SSHRC Doctoral Fellowships.

Program 1.2: Insight: new knowledge in the social sciences and humanities

Description

This program provides grants to support research in the social sciences and humanities conducted by scholars and researchers working as individuals, in teams, and in formal partnerships among the academic, public, private and/or not-for-profit sectors, and to support the building of institutional research capacity. This program is necessary to build knowledge and understanding about people, societies and the world, as well as to inform the search for solutions to societal challenges. The objectives of the program are to build knowledge and understanding from disciplinary, interdisciplinary and/or cross-sectoral perspectives; support new approaches to research on complex and important topics; provide a high-quality research training experience for students; mobilize research knowledge to and from academic and non-academic audiences; and build institutional research capacity. Research supported by the program has the potential to lead to intellectual, cultural, social and economic influence, benefit and impact, and increased institutional research capacity. International research initiatives that offer outstanding opportunities to advance Canadian research are encouraged. Partnerships can include both Canadian and international partners.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$159,789,803 $159,789,803 $157,751,114 $154,451,114

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
53 53 53

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada builds research excellence in social sciences and humanities research Percentage of research projects cited for Canadian and/or international recognition or prizes in a year 15 December 2018
Average number of research contributions per research grant (e.g., peer reviewed articles, presentations, speeches) 14 December 2017
Research is undertaken in areas of strategic importance to Canada Percentage of applications received in Government-identified priority areas 30 Currently met; to be maintained

Planning Highlights

  • International strategy: Review SSHRC’s approach to international engagement and support for international research partnerships and continue to support the development of the Trans-Atlantic Platform as a mechanism to facilitate international research collaboration through joint calls.

Sub-program 1.2.1: Individual, team and partnership research grants

Description

This program provides grants to support research in the social sciences and humanities conducted by scholars and researchers working as individuals, in teams, and in formal partnerships, including international initiatives. This program is necessary to build knowledge and understanding and develop new research questions from disciplinary, interdisciplinary and/or cross-sectoral perspectives. It supports initial-stage research, experimentation with new methods, theoretical approaches and/or ideas, research on complex and important topics, including those that transcend the capacity of any one scholar or institution, and ongoing collaboration and mutual learning. Funding ranges from $7,000 to $2.5 million over one to seven years. The program leverages external funding through collaborative partnerships. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$153,837,425 $151,793,929 $148,493,929

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
51 51 51

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Partners and researchers benefit from research results, linkages and mobilizing knowledge within and across their respective sectors  Ratio of financial contributions leveraged from formal Partnerships Grants ($ leveraged per $ Partnership Grant) 1 December 2017
Ratio of financial contributions leveraged from formal Partnership Development Grants ($ leveraged per $ Partnership Development Grant) 1 December 2017
Research knowledge benefits individuals and organizations Percentage of Insight Grant grantees reporting that their projects benefitted the private, not-for-profit or public sectors 50 June 2018
Students and postdoctoral researchers are trained Percentage of grant spent on students and postdoctoral researchers 35 December 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Partnership data management pilot: Further investigate how best to implement the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management within SSHRC funding opportunities to ensure that the statement will have support from the research community, and the principles will be applied consistently and fairly across all institutions and researchers.
  • Trans-Atlantic Platform—Digging into Data Challenge: Sign an agreement with partners from Europe and the Americas to launch the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. The challenge aims to address how “big data” changes the research landscape for the humanities and social sciences.

Sub-program 1.2.2: Institutional research capacity grants

Description

This program provides grants to Canadian postsecondary institutions for the development of research capacity in the social sciences and humanities. This program is intended to increase research excellence and strengthen research capacity by covering expenses that include the start‑up costs of research centres, support for visiting scholars (travel and stipend), help for emerging scholars to become competitive in national-level grants competitions, and support for national and international dissemination and collaboration. Funding ranges from $5,000 to $30,000 per year for a maximum of three years. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$5,952,378 $5,957,185 $5,957,185

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
2 2 2

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Be Achieved
Canadian universities develop, increase, and strengthen research excellence and capacity in social sciences and the humanities Number of research and research-related activities supported by cycle 5,000 December 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Evaluation of SSHRC’s institutional research capacity grants: Explore responses to the recommendations made in the evaluation, soliciting input from the research community where required.

Program 1.3: Connection: mobilization of social sciences and humanities knowledge

Description

This program provides funding (grants and operational) to support the multidirectional flow, exchange and co-creation of knowledge in the social sciences and humanities among researchers and diverse groups of policy-makers, business leaders, community groups, educators and the media, working as individuals, in teams, in formal partnerships and in networks. This program is necessary to help stimulate leading-edge, internationally competitive research in areas critical to Canada; build multisectoral partnerships; and accelerate the use of multidisciplinary research results by organizations that can harness them for Canadian economic and social development. The program increases the availability and use of social sciences and humanities research knowledge among academic and non-academic audiences; supports the building of reciprocal relationships, networks and tools designed to facilitate scholarly work; and makes such networks and tools more accessible to non-academic audiences. The funding opportunities offered in this program are intended to complement activities funded through the Talent and Insight programs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$28,590,819 $28,590,819 $27,355,833 $24,611,733

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
10 10 10

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Be Achieved
Social sciences and humanities research knowledge is mobilized within academic and non-academic communities Average number of participants per knowledge mobilization activity 60 June 2018

Planning Highlights

  • Assessment of social sciences and humanities research related to Aboriginal Peoples: Use knowledge synthesis grants to assess the capacity of social sciences and humanities research related to the experiences and aspirations of Aboriginal Peoples, including strengths, weaknesses and gaps.

Sub-program 1.3.1: Individual, team and partnership knowledge mobilization grants

Description

This program provides grants to support the knowledge mobilization activities of scholars and researchers working as individuals, in teams, and in formal partnerships with the academic, public, private and/or not-for-profit sectors. This program is necessary to build links between the social sciences and humanities research community and potential users of research, to maximize the impact of research beyond academia and allow for fruitful exchanges and the multidirectional flow of knowledge, and to foster an entrepreneurial spirit. Funding opportunities support the dissemination of research results via publications of various types, such as scholarly journals and books; the organization of events for researchers to meet, discuss, compare and plan research activities; and the co-creation, synthesis and application of research knowledge. The program leverages external funding through collaborative knowledge partnerships. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$10,889,235 $10,859,680 $10,859,680

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
8 8 8

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Partners and researchers benefit from research results, linkages and mobilizing knowledge within and across their respective sectors  Percentage of Connection grants that leverage significantly more than required 70 March 2017
Research knowledge is accessible to the Canadian public Percentage of SSHRC-funded Canadian scholarly journals that are open access 60 Currently met; to be maintained

Planning Highlights

  • Connecting with Canadians for Canada’s 150th: Offer Connection Grants related to Canada’s 150th Anniversary. Connection Grants support workshops, colloquiums, conferences, forums, summer institutes or other events or outreach activities geared toward short-term, targeted knowledge mobilization initiatives. These events and activities represent opportunities to exchange knowledge and to engage on research issues of value to those participating.

Sub-program 1.3.2: Research-based knowledge culture

Description

This program provides support to social sciences and humanities researchers, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and the organization, in the form of prizes and operations and maintenance funds. This program is necessary to develop and sustain a research-based knowledge culture in the social sciences and humanities, by honouring and bringing recognition to researchers, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows whose originality and outstanding contribution to research have enriched Canadian society; by supporting brokering activities aimed at building capacity in other sectors to engage in social sciences and humanities research activities; and by promoting the use of research knowledge, to the benefit of Canadian society. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants and Scholarships.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$1,577,102 $1,573,127 $1,573,127

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
2 2 2

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Be Achieved
Excellent SSHRC-funded research is promoted as beneficial to Canada, internationally and to individual researchers’ careers Percentage of prize/ special fellowship recipients indicating that the award has contributed to career development/ opportunities/ recognition (≥4 on a 5-point scale) 80 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Imagining Canada’s Future symposiums: Hold two major symposiums on two future challenge areas, focusing on experiences and aspirations of Aboriginal Peoples and what knowledge is needed for Canada to thrive in an interconnected, globalized landscape. These symposiums will bring together academic, business, public and private sector leaders.
  • Evaluation of research-based knowledge culture: Conduct the evaluation of the Research-based Knowledge Culture Sub-Program.

Sub-program 1.3.3: Networks of Centres of Excellence

Description

This program provides support to partners in the form of grants through Canada’s three granting agencies. Centres supported through SSHRC focus on social sciences and humanities issues, and support large-scale, virtual research networks that bring together partners from academia, industry, government and not-for-profit organizations. This program comprises the Networks of Centres of Excellence, the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research, and the Business-Led Networks of Centres of Excellence. This program is necessary to harness the creativity and inventiveness of the best minds in various disciplines and sectors to find solutions to critical issues of importance to Canada, using internationally competitive research, building multisectoral partnerships and accelerating the use of multidisciplinary research results by organizations that can use them for economic, social and environmental benefits to Canada. This includes creating centres to advance research and facilitate the commercialization of technologies, products and services within priority areas and helping to increase private sector investments in Canadian research and support training of skilled researchers. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Networks of Centres of Excellence and Business-Led Networks of Centres of Excellence.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$16,124,480 $14,923,026 $12,178,926

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
0 0 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Be Achieved
The research knowledge and technology produced by the networks and centres is transferred and used Ratio of partner contributions (cash and in-kind) relative to Networks of Centres of Excellence funds for commercialization activities (Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research program) and research activities (Business-Led Networks of Centres of Excellence program). 1 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Networks of Centres of Excellence renewal competition: Launch the renewal competition for the 2012 Networks of Centres of Excellence cohort.
  • New Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research competition: Award new Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research based on the results of the competition.
  • Evaluation of Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research: Evaluate the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research program, informed by an environmental scan scheduled to be completed by the end of the 2015–16.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canada has the institutional capacity to enable research and research-related activities in social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering and health

Program 2.1: Indirect costs of research

Description

This program provides support to institutions in the form of grants in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering, and health. This program is necessary to build institutional capacity for the conduct of research and research-related activities, to maximize the investment of publicly funded academic research. This program helps to offset the central and departmental administrative costs that institutions incur in supporting research, which are not attributable to specific research projects, such as lighting and heating, maintenance of libraries, laboratories and research networking spaces; or for the technical support required for an institution’s website or library computer system, ultimately helping researchers concentrate on cutting-edge discoveries and scholarship excellence, and ensuring that federally funded research projects are conducted in world-class facilities with the best equipment and administrative support available. The program is administered by the SSHRC-hosted Chairs Secretariat on behalf of the three research granting agencies. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Research Support Fund.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$341,615,386 $341,615,386 $341,611,587 $341,611,587

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
2 2 2

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Universities and colleges sustain a strong research environment Percentage of institutions reporting general positive impacts of their grants in the attraction of additional funding 80 March 2017
Percentage of institutions reporting general positive impacts of their grants in the attraction and retention of researchers 90 March 2017

Planning Highlights

  • Consolidation of the new Research Support Fund reporting structure: Launch new reporting forms and collect and analyze data in order to prepare the first summary report since the transition from the Indirect Costs Program to the Research Support Fund.

Program 2.2: Canada First Research Excellence Fund

Description

The program provides financial support in the form of grants to Canadian universities and colleges to excel globally in research areas that create long-term economic advantages for Canada. The program helps competitively-selected institutions implement ambitious and focused strategies to attract and retain talent, develop partnerships across sectors nationally and internationally, and undertake cutting-edge research. Consequently, the program will contribute to enhancing Canada’s competitiveness in the global, knowledge-based economy, improving Canadians’ health, and enriching our social and cultural life. The program is administered by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council on behalf of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Canada First Research Excellence Fund.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$2,494,438 $2,494,438 $2,484,435 $2,484,435

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
6 6 6

Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Be Achieved
Competitively-selected postsecondary institutions excel globally in research areas that create long-term economic advantages for Canada Percentage of institutions demonstrating progress toward global leadership targets 100 June 2019

Planning Highlights

  • Second competition of the Canada First Research Excellence Fund: Complete the second competition, including adjudication of full proposals and announcement of results.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
$14,029,252 $14,029,252 $13,633,162 $13,633,162

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
105 105 105

Planning Highlights

  • People strategy: Approve and launch SSHRC’s People Strategy Action Plan for 2016–20.
  • Activities related to open government: Implement SSHRC’s Open Government Implementation Plan.
  • Financial management transformation: Identify the impacts of the transition to PeopleSoft/Phoenix and address any gaps identified.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of SSHRC’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.
Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on SSHRC’s website.

 

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015-16
Estimated Results
2016-17
Planned Results
Difference
(2016-17 Planned Results minus 2015-16 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 724,545,290 724,673,696 128,406
Total revenues 224,976  94,976 (130,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 724,320,314 724,578,720 258,406

Total expenses are expected to remain constant in the next fiscal year. Year-over-year revenues are expected to decline by $130,000 following the conclusion in 2015–16 of the Trans-Atlantic Platform event hosted by SSHRC, where partner contributions are recorded as revenue.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities are available on SSHRC’s website:

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in that publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Matthew Lucas

Executive Director
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Corporate Strategy and Performance Division

350 Albert Street
PO Box 1610, Station B
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 6G4
Canada

Telephone: 613-944-6230

Email: matthew.lucas@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca


Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three‑year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures: Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures: Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.