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Date published: March 20, 2020

2013-14 Part III - Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP)

Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

Minister of State’s Message

Section I: Organizational Overview

Section II: Analysis of Program by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Other Items of Interest



Minister’s Message

Christian Paradis, Ministry of Industry

In response to the continuing challenges facing the global economy, our government is determined to keep Canada strong and prosperous by creating the right conditions for businesses to invest in innovation, create jobs and grow our economy.

As Minister of Industry, I am pleased that the Industry Portfolio continues to play a key role in promoting innovation, improving Canada’s marketplace policies, and efficiently managing programs and services. In doing so, we are advancing Canada’s international position by supporting business growth, research and development, and targeted investment.

In refreshing the science and technology strategy and its priorities, we will strengthen federal support for business innovation and continue to build Canada’s knowledge-based economy.

Throughout 2013–14, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s (SSHRC) commitment will remain clear: to support talented individuals and the innovative research that will contribute to a better future for Canada and to invest in ideas and the research training that will help develop the country’s best and brightest scholars and produce future leaders. SSHRC-funded researchers engage with communities, governments and businesses in all sectors—from management experts helping companies open doors to investment and export opportunities, to sociologists employing data mining expertise to better respond to consumer needs, to geographers building sophisticated models for tracking the flow of ideas, information and people in the global digital economy. As a result, a variety of sectors are being introduced to new ways of capturing and sharing the many benefits that research and research training in the social sciences and humanities can bring to Canada’s economic growth and prosperity.

In fulfilling its mandate, the Industry Portfolio will prudently manage its financial and human resources and will play its part in the government’s efforts to return to fiscal balance.

This year’s Report on Plans and Priorities for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada articulates our approach to modernizing the Canadian marketplace, boosting innovation, and helping drive the competitiveness of Canadian businesses and communities. On behalf of the Department and Portfolio, I look forward to working with my Cabinet and parliamentary colleagues, as well as with the private sector and other levels of government, to accomplish these objectives.

The original version was signed by
Christian Paradis
Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)



Minister of State’s Message

Gary Goodyear, Minister of State

As the Minister of State for Science and Technology, I am pleased to introduce the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

The report comes at a time when we have good reason to reflect on our many accomplishments and Canada’s solid global reputation.

Late last year, the Council of Canadian Academies released its second report on the state of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The Council found Canadian S&T to be healthy and growing and recognized for its excellence around the world.

The Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has praised Canada for the way it weathered the economic storms of the past several years. Our fiscal policy and our financial system are in good shape. As is the Canadian innovation system.

The government supports an advanced economy and the creation of high-quality jobs through investments in education and training, basic and applied research, and the translation of public research knowledge to the private sector. We are focused on the conditions necessary for a high performing innovation system: supportive marketplace frameworks, engaged citizens, highly skilled people and sound infrastructure.

Since 2006, we have invested $8 billion in new funding for science, technology and the growth of innovative firms. Guided by our S&T strategy, we are redefining the way governments, business people and the research community band together to drive economic activity through science.

Throughout the next year and beyond, a key strategic goal for the SSHRC is to strengthen Canada’s position as a world leader in research and research training. SSHRC will encourage a culture of innovation by working with Canadian colleges and universities to build and promote a 21st century training environment and promote the development of Canada’s next generation of researchers. SSHRC-funded researchers bring their knowledge and skills to a variety of sectors, enabling them to innovate, prosper and improve the quality of life of all Canadians.

At a time when innovation is increasingly dependent on collaboration, Canada is taking a leadership role by delivering programs that bring the private and public sectors together, creating a supportive climate for start-ups, and attracting and retaining world-class expertise. In 2013–14, I will continue to work with our academic partners, the private sector and Canadians to achieve the priorities laid out in this report.

The original version was signed by
Gary Goodyear
Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)




Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’être

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) funds research and research training that builds knowledge about people, past and present, with a view toward creating a better future. From questions of family and culture to concerns about jobs and employment, research about people—how we live, what we think and how we act—informs new knowledge and insights on the issues that matter most to Canadians.

SSHRC-funded research and research training play a unique role within Canada’s science, technology and innovation system, and are key to meeting Canada’s productivity agenda. Social sciences and humanities research fosters the development of the creative and analytical skills needed to respond to the complex emerging challenges of critical importance to Canadians. SSHRC helps advance Canada’s advantages, as outlined in the federal science and technology (S&T) strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada’s Advantage, by ensuring that Canada is a world leader in social sciences and humanities research and research training, and by ensuring that Canada has the institutional capacity to enable research and research-related activities in social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering, and health. SSHRC achieves these results through four programs:

  1. Talent—attraction, retention and development of students and researchers in the social sciences and humanities to build a People Advantage;
  2. Insight—new knowledge in the social sciences and humanities to strengthen Canada’s Knowledge Advantage;
  3. Connection—mobilization of social sciences and humanities knowledge to contribute to Canada’s Entrepreneurial Advantage; and
  4. Indirect Costs of Research—building of institutional capacity for the conduct of research and research-related activities to maximize the investment of publicly funded academic research and achieve World-Class Excellence.

SSHRC actively contributes to the federal government’s S&T agenda by supporting research and research training related to priority areas, including environmental science and technologies, finance and business, and new media and communications. The results of these and other investments are used by SSHRC-supported experts, in collaboration with key stakeholders from the private, public and not-for-profit sectors, to translate knowledge into new and productive solutions and applications. In addition, SSHRC-funded research plays a vital role in the innovation process, establishing pathways for the commercialization of invention across the scientific spectrum, and through its training programs, in helping to establish the cultures of innovation within all disciplines that drive creativity and enterprise. SSHRC disciplines, finally, play a critical role in informing policy at all government levels and in assessing the efficacy and impact of strategic initiatives fueling economic output within both the public and private sectors.

Responsibilities

SSHRC is an agency that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Industry. It was created through an act of Parliament in 1977 and mandated to:

  • promote and assist research and scholarship in the social sciences and humanities; and
  • advise the Minister in respect of such matters relating to such research as the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration.

To fulfill its mandate, SSHRC offers funding opportunities that provide Canadian researchers and students with grants, scholarships and fellowships, respecting the terms of the federal Policy on Transfer Payments. SSHRC is also responsible for administering the following tri-agency programs, offered jointly with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR):

  • the Canada Research Chairs Program;
  • the Canada Excellence Research Chairs Program; and
  • the Indirect Costs Program.

In addition, SSHRC works with Industry Canada, as well as with NSERC and CIHR, to support Networks of Centres of Excellence initiatives. It also collaborates with NSERC and CIHR to deliver the Canada Graduate Scholarships, Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships and Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships programs. SSHRC will continue to foster this collaboration to the benefit of all Canadians by building on the harmonization of tri-agency programs, practices and policies.

The president of SSHRC is supported by a governing council appointed by order in council to reflect the perspectives of the academic, public and private sectors. SSHRC’s governing council promotes and assists research and scholarship in the social sciences and humanities. It meets regularly to set strategic policy and program priorities, allocate budgets, and advise the Minister of Industry and Parliament on research in these areas.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

 

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council's Program Alignment Architecture

[text version]

Organizational Priorities

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Promote and support Canadian excellence in social sciences and humanities research and talent development New SO 1.0
Description

Why is this a priority?

Talented, skilled, creative people are at the heart of successful societies. Demand is growing across the private, public and not-for-profit sectors for highly qualified individuals such as those who exhibit the leadership qualities required for success in the 21st century economy: i.e. those who are creative, analytical and articulate, as well as sophisticated in their understanding of individuals, communities and societies in the past and present. These qualities are acquired through direct engagement—on the part of both researchers and students—in excellent research where both intellectual (e.g., rigour, objectivity, analysis, synthesis, creativity) and professional (e.g., communication, collaboration across disciplines, building partnerships with government, community-based and private sector partners, building networks, managing large teams) skills are effectively nurtured.

SSHRC must continue to be at the forefront of promoting world-class research and engagement in Canada in a number of ways, first and foremost by working closely with Canada’s research community to update policies and practices for fostering research excellence. As the premier funder of social sciences and humanities research in Canada, SSHRC must also ensure its assessment criteria and merit-review processes evolve in keeping with the changing character of research excellence. Finally, because research excellence is defined in an international context, Canadian social sciences and humanities research must be increasingly connected to global research networks and contribute to global research agendas.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Promote the skills, tools and infrastructure necessary for success in research and research training.
  • Champion merit review processes that are robust, efficient, sustainable, and that recognize a broad range of research contributions.
  • Strengthen and promote international connections and collaboration in research and talent development.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Work with Canadian postsecondary institutions and other organizations to build a 21st-century research and training environment in the social sciences and humanities New SO 1.0
Description

Why is this a priority?

Excellent research and research training do not occur in a vacuum—they require an enabling and fertile environment. This environment includes institutions (postsecondary institutions, in particular) as well as a number of other structures, policies and supports. SSHRC, along with other federal and provincial funders of research, plays an important part in Canada’s research and research training environment.

But the nature of research and scholarship is changing—as are Canada’s postsecondary campuses. Researchers and students are increasingly asking questions and addressing them in ways that challenge established disciplinary boundaries. Many research fields are seeing an increase in scale: there are new, massive datasets, as well as larger and more diverse research teams. Research that engages communities and the public, private and not-for-profit sectors is now common on campuses from coast to coast. And there is a growing appetite within both academic and non-academic sectors to see, access and use the knowledge and understanding that results from research. The structures that comprise Canada’s research and training environment therefore need to change as well. SSHRC must assist our post-secondary institutions to adapt to ensure Canada can continue to provide the enabling environment in which researchers can do excellent work and new talent can be trained with advanced research skills, while at the same time, through development of appropriate achievement measurement tools, ensure that change is successfully implemented.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Facilitate world-class research and research training by regularly updating all steps in the grant management process to ensure they are effective, efficient and enabling.
  • Strengthen policies and other supports that recognize, preserve and value the full range of outputs, outcomes and impacts of research and training.
  • Support and broaden co-operation among Canada’s research granting agencies in policy and program development and delivery.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Position knowledge and expertise about human thought and behaviour to bring maximal benefits to Canada and the world New SO 1.0
Description

Why is this a priority?

The benefits of social sciences and humanities research can be seen in every aspect of Canadian society, from assisting the development and assessing the impact of the laws and policies passed by our governments, to the successful implementation of business innovation strategies, the training of next-generation leaders, and the revision of the curricula used in our elementary and secondary school classrooms. While it is clear that SSHRC funding is contributing to so many facets of life in communities across Canada and around the world, Canada’s social sciences and humanities knowledge and expertise must be actively stewarded for its benefits to be sustained and available to its citizens.

SSHRC, in partnership with the research community, has a responsibility to ensure that the benefits of research and talent development are realized as fully as possible. We must see to it that opportunities are seized for the social sciences and humanities to contribute to national debate; address the challenges of today and tomorrow; and produce new intellectual, economic, social and cultural value. And this must be done for the benefit not only of Canada but also of the world.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Support research and talent development activities in areas identified as important future challenge areas for Canada.
  • Promote the value of multisectoral partnerships for Talent, Insight and Connection.
  • Enhance and promote the contribution of social sciences and humanities to robust cultures of innovation across the private, public and not-for-profit sectors in Canada.



Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Improve SSHRC’s governance, management and service delivery, focusing on results for Canadians Previously committed to

SO 1.0
SO 2.0

Description

Why is this a priority?

Since 2006, SSHRC has been undertaking measures to improve its corporate governance and management structures, such that it is now recognized as a leader among organizations of its type both nationally and internationally. It has also worked to effectively manage and ensure the continued and substantial contribution of the thousands of research community members who provide immense in-kind benefit to SSHRC’s grant review operation. These changes are enabling an even more streamlined and rigorous approach to corporate planning and reporting, and are enhancing SSHRC’s effectiveness as an organization that delivers results in the most efficient manner possible for Canadians.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Improve governance and management practices by building stronger links between strategic, operational, financial and human resources planning.
  • Strengthen functional authorities and accountabilities.
  • Enhance service delivery for operational effectiveness and improved client services.

Risk Analysis

While SSHRC administers a significant budget—roughly $353.3 million for SSHRC programs and $332.8 million for the Indirect Costs Program, which SSHRC manages on behalf of the three federal research granting agencies—the overall level of risk to the organization and to the safety and security of the Canadian public is low.

SSHRC continues to integrate risk management into its overall governance and planning processes. Risks are tracked, assessed and managed at both the operational and corporate levels.

SSHRC’s corporate risk profile is integrated within its Corporate Risk Management Framework (CRMF). The CRMF provides a comprehensive view of operational and corporate risks, and assigns responsibility for their management and mitigation. It is used as a strategic planning tool, and is updated yearly as part of SSHRC’s annual planning cycle, which integrates priority-setting, resource allocation and risk management. This approach to risk management is aligned with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Framework for the Management of Risk.

In the 2012-13 review of its CRMF, SSHRC updated its risk inventory, which now comprises 14 risks specific to SSHRC and its environment. The CRMF incorporates existing controls and mitigation strategies specific to the 14 risks. These strategies build on progress made in previous years. All risks are monitored regularly through established reporting processes, but the three risks in the following table have been identified by management for more rigorous monitoring and follow-up.

Risk Incremental Controls and Mitigation Strategies
1. Managing the budget
  • Modernize the Budget Management Framework, quarterly budget reviews, reallocation processes and business case process to prioritize funding allocations. The budgeting process is part of the integrated planning process.
2. Managing internal change
  • Integrate a change management model into the Project Management Framework.
  • Continue to build on the job-specific training provided to staff in the context of continuing to roll out SSHRC’s new program architecture.
  • Offer training on diverse software and the grants management system at every level.
  • Offer advice and support to front-line staff that are transitioning to virtual methods of adjudication.
3. Leveraging Information technology innovation
  • Offer training to staff on new technologies.
  • Eliminate duplication.
  • Assess skills, operations and security.
  • Continue to implement a grants management system.
  • Increase service levels.

Planning Summary

Financial Resources ($ millions)


Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14*
Planned Spending 2013–14* Planned Spending 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16
682.8 686.1 682.8 683.1

* The difference between the total budgetary expenditures and the planned spending for 2013-14 is due to additional funding received for the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research (CECR) program through the Supplementary Estimates (C) process.

Human Resources (FTEs)


2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
192 192 192

Planning Summary Tables for Strategic Outcomes and Programs ($ millions)

Strategic Outcome 1.0: Canada is a world leader in social sciences and humanities research and research training
Program Actual
Spending
2010-11*
Actual
Spending
2011-12*
Forecast
Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
1.1 Talent: attraction, retention and development of students and researchers in the social sciences and humanities 175.5 177.9 176.0 173.5 173.5 173.4 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
1.2 Insight: new knowledge in the social sciences and humanities 130.0 130.4 138.0 135.2 135.2 135.6 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
1.3 Connection: mobilization of social sciences and humanities knowledge 36.6 41.2 35.3 29.2 25.9 25.9 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
Sub–Total 342.1 349.5 349.3 337.9 334.6 334.9  

* These figures do not match previous Departmental Performance Report (DPR) submissions due to the changes in the Program Alignment Architecture being implemented for the first time in 2012-13.


Strategic Outcome 2.0: Canada has the institutional capacity to enable research and research-related activities in social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering and health
($ millions)
Program Actual
Spending
2010-11*
Actual
Spending
2011-12*
Forecast
Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
2.1 Indirect Costs of Research 329.7 332.0 332.1 332.8 332.8 332.8 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
Sub–Total 329.7 329.7 332.7 332.8 332.8 332.8  

* These figures do not match previous DPR submissions due to the changes in the Program Alignment Architecture being implemented for the first time in 2012-13.

Planning Summary Table for Internal Services
($ millions)
Program Actual
Spending
2010-11*
Actual
Spending
2011-12*
Forecast
Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
3.1 Internal Services 17.3 16.4 17.6 15.4 15.4 15.4
Sub–Total 17.3 16.4 17.6 15.4 15.4 15.4

* These figures do not match previous DPR submissions due to the changes in the Program Alignment Architecture being implemented for the first time in 2012-13.

Planning Summary Total
($ millions)
Program Actual
Spending
2010-11*
Actual
Spending
2011-12*
Forecast
Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Total 689.1 697.9 699.0 686.1 682.8 683.1

* These figures do not match previous DPR submissions due to the changes in the Program Alignment Architecture being implemented for the first time in 2012-13.

Expenditure Profile

For the 2013-14 fiscal year, SSHRC plans to spend roughly $353.3 million for SSHRC programs and $332.8 million for the Indirect Costs Program, for a total of $686.1 million, to meet the expected results of its programs and to contribute to its strategic outcomes.

The graph below illustrates SSHRC’s actual and planned expenditures from 2009-10 to 2015-16.

In the graph, spending for 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 represents the total authorities disbursed as reflected in the Public Accounts of Canada. For 2012-13, the forecast spending amounts indicated on the graph include all parliamentary appropriations: main estimates, supplementary estimates and carry-forward. For 2013-14 to 2015-16, planned spending includes the figures from the 2013-14 Annual Reference Level Update plus anticipated funding being requested through the supplementary estimates.

SSHRC will continue its funding commitments to government priorities, including those associated with the S&T strategy. This will include funding projects related to the digital economy, management, business and finance, the environment, and northern communities.

As part of Canada’s Economic Action Plan, SSHRC received temporary additional funding in Budget 2009 for 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12. SSHRC also received additional ongoing funding in Budget 2011 and Budget 2012.

Departmental Spending Trend

SSHRC expenditures, actual and planned, 2009-10 to 2015-16

SSHRC expenditures, actual and planned, 2009-10 to 2015-16 w

[text version]

SSHRC expenditures related to the Indirect Costs Program, actual and planned, 2009-10 to 2015-16

SSHRC expenditures related to the Indirect Costs Program, actual and planned, 2009-10 to 2015-16

[text version]

Estimates by Vote

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2012–13 Main Estimates publication.


Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1.0: Canada is a world leader in social sciences and humanities research and research training

 

Performance Indicators Targets
Number of Canadian institutions appearing in top-50 international rankings in the social sciences and humanities Three by 2014-15
Canadian social sciences and humanities citation impact relative to world baselines Top-10 ranking internationally by 2017-18
Degree completion rates of Canadian students versus other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries Top-10 ranking internationally by 2014-15

Program Activity 1.1: Talent: attraction, retention and development of students and researchers in the social sciences and humanities

Program Description

This program provides support to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the form of fellowships, and to researchers in postsecondary institutions in the form of grants that cover salary and the direct costs of research. This program is necessary in order to attract, retain and develop talent in the social sciences and humanities, to cultivate leaders within academia and across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors, and to build centres of world-class research excellence at Canadian postsecondary institutions. The program brands Canada as a top destination for research and research training.

Financial Resources ($ millions)


Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending 2013–14 Planned Spending 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16
173.5 173.5 173.5 173.4

Human Resources (FTEs)


2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
34 34 34


Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
SSHRC-funded scholarship and fellowship recipients are employed in positions of leadership, research, management, etc. in Canada and internationally Employment rates of SSHRC-funded scholarship and fellowship recipients by degree and sector 85 per cent Master’s, 85 per cent Doctoral, 90 per cent Postdoctoral by 2014-15
Canada builds research excellence and research capacity by attracting, developing and retaining world-class social sciences and humanities researchers in Canadian institutions Proportion of social sciences and humanities Chairs awarded to Canadian, returning expatriate and foreign candidates 75 per cent Canadians, 12.5 per cent expatriates, 25 per cent foreigners by 2014-15
Proportion of SSHRC Talent-funded researchers receiving Canadian and/or international recognition or prizes 5 per cent by 2017-18

Planning Highlights

  • Pursue the harmonization of the Canada Graduate Scholarships Program across the three federal research granting agencies.
  • Deliver phase 2 of the Canada Excellence Research Chairs competition.
  • Complete the evaluation of the Canada Excellence Research Chairs Program in partnership with CIHR and NSERC.
  • Award the first grants for partnered research training initiatives under the Talent program, to support the creation of innovative approaches that enrich research training experiences for students and postdoctoral researchers while facilitating their transition to academic or non-academic workplace settings.

Program Activity 1.2: Insight: new knowledge in the social sciences and humanities

Program Description

This program provides grants to support research in the social sciences and humanities conducted by scholars and researchers working as individuals, in teams, and in formal partnerships among the academic, public, private and/or not-for-profit sectors and to support the building of institutional research capacity. This program is necessary to build knowledge and understanding about people, societies and the world, as well as to inform the search for solutions to societal challenges.

The objectives of the program are to build knowledge and understanding from disciplinary, interdisciplinary and/or cross-sector perspectives; support new approaches to research on complex and important topics; provide a high-quality research training experience for students; mobilize research knowledge to and from academic and non-academic audiences; and build institutional research capacity. Research supported by the program has the potential to lead to intellectual, cultural, social and economic influence, benefit and impact, and increased institutional research capacity. International research initiatives that offer outstanding opportunities to advance Canadian research are encouraged. Partnerships can include both Canadian and international partners from academic institutions and Canadian partners from public, private and/or not-for-profit sectors.

Financial Resources ($ millions)


Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending 2013–14 Planned Spending 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16
135.2 135.2 135.2 135.6

Human Resources (FTEs)


2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
35 35 35


Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
SSHRC funds excellent social sciences and humanities researchers / new scholars Number of research projects cited for Canadian and/or international recognition or prizes 100 by 2015-16
Creation of new/enhanced research knowledge Average number of research contributions per grant (e.g., peer-reviewed articles, presentations, speeches) 14 by 2015-16
Additional funding is leveraged to advance research, build capacity and increase intersectoral understanding among partners Ratio of actual financial contributions leveraged from formal Partnerships grants compared to SSHRC funding 0.35:1 ($) by 2014-15

Planning Highlights

  • Identify four or five priority areas resulting from the Imagining Canada’s Future initiative and develop an implementation framework for their integration into SSHRC’s program architecture and corporate activities.
  • Launch a new online achievement reporting system for Insight Development Grants that will capture data and information on the results and outcomes of the funding provided.

Program Activity 1.3: Connection: mobilization of social sciences and humanities knowledge

Program Description

This program provides funding (grants and operational) to support the multidirectional flow, exchange and co-creation of knowledge in the social sciences and humanities among researchers and diverse groups of policy-makers, business leaders, community groups, educators and the media working as individuals, in teams, in formal partnerships and in networks. This program is necessary to help stimulate leading-edge, internationally competitive research in areas critical to Canada, build multisectoral partnerships and accelerate the use of multidisciplinary research results by organizations that can harness them for Canadian economic and social development. The program increases the availability and use of social sciences and humanities research knowledge among academic and non-academic audiences; supports the building of reciprocal relationships, networks and tools designed to facilitate scholarly work; and makes such networks and tools more accessible to non-academic audiences. The funding opportunities offered in this program are intended to complement activities funded through the Talent and Insight programs.

Financial Resources ($ millions)


Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14*
Planned Spending 2013–14* Planned Spending 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16
25.9 29.2 25.9 25.9

* The difference between the total budgetary expenditures and the planned spending for 2013-14 is due to additional funding received for the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research (CECR) program through the Supplementary Estimates (C) process.

Human Resources (FTEs)


2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
14 14 14



Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets

Partners and researchers benefit from linkages and mobilizing knowledge within and across their respective sectors

Proportion of researchers and partners indicating their partnership to be “quite successful” (≥4 on a 5-point scale)

60 per cent by 2015-16

Additional funding is leveraged to mobilize knowledge in social sciences and humanities

Ratio of actual financial contributions leveraged from Connection grants compared to SSHRC funding 0:35:1 ($) by 2014-15

Planning Highlights

  • Launch a renewed consolidated suite of prizes to recognize and celebrate extraordinary achievements in social sciences and humanities research, talent and knowledge mobilization.
  • Update SSHRC’s policy on research outputs, including its policies on open access and research data archiving, in collaboration with NSERC and CIHR as appropriate.

Strategic Outcome 2.0: Canada has the institutional capacity to enable research and research-related activities in social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering and health

Performance Indicators Targets
Number of Canadian universities appearing in Top-300 QS World University Rankings 16 by 2017-18
Proportion of institutions indicating increased capacity to attract and retain world-class researchers (≥6 on a 10-point scale) 80 per cent by 2015-16
Research funding advantage from federal, provincial and private sources as percentage of gross domestic product compared to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development averages 30 per cent by 2014-15

Program Activity 2.1: Indirect Costs of Research

Program Description

This program provides support to institutions in the form of grants in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering, and health. This program is necessary to build institutional capacity for the conduct of research and research-related activities to maximize the investment of publicly funded academic research. This program helps to offset the central and departmental administrative costs that institutions incur in supporting research, which are not attributable to specific research projects, such as lighting and heating, maintenance of libraries, laboratories and research networking spaces, or for the technical support required for an institution's website or library computer system, ultimately helping researchers concentrate on cutting-edge discoveries and scholarship excellence, and ensuring that federally funded research projects are conducted in world-class facilities with the best equipment and administrative support available. The program is administered by the SSHRC-hosted Canada Research Chairs Secretariat on behalf of the three research granting agencies.

Financial Resources ($ millions)


Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending 2013–14 Planned Spending 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16
332.8 332.8 332.8 332.8

Human Resources (FTEs)


2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
4 4 4


Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets

Universities and colleges have the necessary resources to host world-class research and enable knowledge mobilizationn

Proportion of institutions reporting maintained or improved capacity to support research activities by providing:

  • management and administration services
  • research resources (such as libraries)
  • research facilities
  • regulatory compliance
  • intellectual property management
80 per cent by 2017-18

Planning Highlights

  • Launch data collection for baseline metrics on research resources or research management capacity or regulatory compliance, and further develop and consult on proposed metrics for research facilities and intellectual property management capacity.
  • Complete the program evaluation of the Indirect Costs Program.

3.1: Internal Services

Program Description

Internal Services provide support to the organization as whole in the form of operation and maintenance funds. They are necessary to support the delivery of programs and other corporate obligations. Internal Services include activities such as resource management, governance and asset management that apply across the organization, rather than those that support a specific program.

Financial Resources ($ millions)


Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending 2013–14 Planned Spending 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16
15.4 15.4 15.4 15.4

Human Resources (FTEs)


2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
105 105 105


Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets

Effective management frameworks (policies, processes and controls) for all activities and resources that apply across the organization

Treasury Board Secretariat’s Management Accountability Framework (MAF) rating for the Area of Management # 3—Effectiveness of the Corporate Management Structure

“Acceptable” MAF rating in 2013-14

MAF rating for the Area of Management # 12—Effectiveness of Information Management

“Acceptable” MAF rating in 2013-14

MAF rating for the Area of Management # 17—Effectiveness of Financial Management and Control

“Acceptable” MAF rating in 2013-14


Planning Highlights

  • Strengthen functional authorities and accountabilities to increase the effectiveness of SSHRC’s financial monitoring systems and to support results-based management.
  • Develop and implement an internal governance assessment process in support of effective and efficient decision-making.
  • Enhance service delivery for operational effectiveness and improved client services by participating in the federal government’s shared financial systems and services initiative for small departments and agencies.
  • Undertake a follow-up information management audit to ensure that recommendations outlined in previous information management audits have been implemented and that any issues identified have been addressed.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

The future-oriented financial highlights presented in this Report on Plans and Priorities are intended to serve as a general overview of SSHRC’s financial position and operations. These financial highlights are prepared on an accrual basis to strengthen accountability and improve transparency and financial management.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position
For the Year (ended March 31)
($ millions)
  $ Change Forcast
201-14
Forcast
2012-13
Total Expenses (10.6) 690.6 701.2
Total Revenues 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers (10.6) 690.6 701.2
Departmental net financial position 0.3 1.3 1.0


SSHRC expenses by Type: Transfer payments, Salaries and employee benefits and Other operating spending

[text version]

Total expenses are projected to be $693 million in fiscal year 2012-13. The majority of these expenses are for transfer payments ($662 million) in the form of grants and scholarships related to departmental programs. The balance of spending is made up of salaries and employee benefits ($21 million) and other operating expenses ($10 million). The latter two types of expenses are required to support departmental programs and other corporate obligations.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position
For the Year (ended March 31)
($ millions)
  $ Change Forcast
2013-14
Forcast
2012-13
Total net liabilities 5.0 5.0
Total net financial assets 3.9 3.9
Departmental net debt 1.1 1.1
Total non-financial assets 0.3 2.4 2.1
Departmental net financial position 0.3 1.3 1.0

 

Future-Oriented Financial Statements

SSHRC’s future-oriented financial statements can be found on SSHRC's website.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on SSHRC’s website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits.  The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication.  The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.



Section IV - Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Christine Trauttmansdorff
Executive Director
Corporate Strategy and Performance
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
350 Albert Street
Ottawa, ON  K1P 6G4
Email: christine.trauttmansdorff@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca
Tel.: 613-944-6230