“…understanding what the impacts are of the offshore industry on … other natural resources is very important.”

—Gail Fraser

What effects will the quest for energy and natural resources have on our society and our position on the world stage?


The ability to collectively and sustainably access and benefit from natural resources and energy in the face of socio-economic, cultural and governance issues, regulatory frameworks, and the development of new technologies, is recognized by Canadians as central to their future.

Sustainable development of Canada’s natural resources, along with Canadian interest in natural resources and energy abroad, is critical to a prosperous future. Canadians have always been well aware of the rich resources of their country, and have debated how best to manage those resources. And our ability to capitalize on these resources with new processes and technologies is being transformed.


Questions for further exploration:

  1. What effects might the global quest for valuable natural resources have on Canada’s rural and remote, resource-based communities, such as in the North and the Arctic?
  2. What could be the cultural, social, economic and environmental impacts of disruptive technologies for accessing and developing natural resources (e.g., fracking, deep-sea drilling, drones, genetic modification)?
  3. How can Canadian natural resources be developed in such a way as to respect Aboriginal rights and benefit First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities?
  4. What effects might the development of Canadian energy and natural resources have on governance and regulatory systems, decision-making, and Canada’s sovereignty, particularly in the Arctic?
  5. What conflict and security issues might emerge as a result of changing global pressures surrounding energy, natural and rare resources?
  6. What will the outcomes be of global pressures on accessibility and availability of food, water and energy?


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