Sport Participation Research Initiative

2015-16 Competitions

A Joint Initiative of SSHRC and Sport Canada

Application deadline Value Duration Results announced Apply
Insight Grants

October 15, 2015, for full application

$7,000 up to $100,000 annually, to a maximum of $400,000 over 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years Spring 2016 See details under Description below
Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplements

September 23, 2015
$10,000 in addition to the value of the SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship 12 months Spring 2016 See details under Description below
Doctoral Award Supplements

For applicants registered at a Canadian postsecondary institution, the institution sets the deadline. For all other applicants, the deadline is November 5, 2015.
$10,000 in addition to the value of the doctoral award 12 months Spring 2016 See details under Description below

Note: If a deadline falls on a weekend or a Canadian public holiday, the online application system will remain open until 8 p.m. (eastern time) on the next business day.


Context
Objectives
Description
Value and Duration
Eligibility
Evaluation and Adjudication
Regulations, Policies and Related Information
Contact Information



Context

The joint Sport Participation Research Initiative (SPRI) supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy by funding selected doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers and postsecondary institution-affiliated researchers to conduct research on matters related to enhancing participation in sport—and to the outcomes thereof—in Canada.

Canadian Sport Policy 2012 set a direction for 2012-22 for all governments, institutions and organizations committed to realizing the positive impacts of sport on individuals, communities and society.

The 2012 Policy builds on the success of the 2002 version, the first-ever intergovernmental policy for sport, which was endorsed in Iqaluit, Nunavut, in April 2002, by the federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for sport. The 2002 policy provided a pan-Canadian vision and framework for sport and formed the basis for the Government of Canada’s Physical Activity and Sport Act (2003).

Sport Canada worked in collaboration with provincial/territorial governments and sport sector leaders in carrying out the Canadian Sport Policy renewal process over 2010-12. The process included an unprecedented level of consultations with the Canadian public, government officials, sport stakeholders, and representatives of related sectors at the local, community, provincial/territorial, and national levels.

The consultations involved more than 50 in-person meetings across Canada, including outreach to specific groups, such as women, persons with disabilities, aboriginal people, specific ethno-cultural communities, and official language minority communities. An e-survey also resulted in more than 3,300 responses from more than 800 organizations and 2,500 individuals.

Canadian Sport Policy 2012 was endorsed in Inuvik, North West Territories, on June 27, 2012, by federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for sport, physical activity and recreation, including Canada’s Minister of State (Sport).

One desired outcome of Canadian Sport Policy 2012 is that both the number and diversity of Canadians participating in sport will increase over 2012-22.

The policy sets out five broad objectives:

  • Introduction to sport: Canadians have the fundamental skills, knowledge and attitudes to participate in organized and unorganized sport.
  • Recreational sport: Canadians have the opportunity to participate in sport for fun, health, social interaction and relaxation.
  • Competitive sport: Canadians have the opportunity to systematically improve and measure their performance against others in competition in a safe and ethical manner.
  • High-performance sport: Canadians are systematically achieving world-class results at the highest levels of international competition through fair and ethical means.
  • Sport for development: Sport is used as a tool for social and economic development, and the promotion of positive values at home and abroad.

The full text of the Policy is available on the Sport Information Resource Centre website.


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Objectives

The SPRI has two broad objectives:

  1. to promote Canadian research that will develop better understanding, based on empirical evidence, of Canadians' participation in sport, in order to better inform programs and policies intended to promote and enhance Canadians' participation in sport; and
  2. to build Canada's capacity to conduct research on and related to participation in sport, specifically in the target areas described below.

To help achieve these objectives, all SPRI grant and award holders are expected to participate in an annual Sport Canada Research Initiative conference as a condition of holding their grant or award.


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Description

The initiative offers three separate funding mechanisms to support research on participation in sport in Canada.

Research Grants

The partners seek to stimulate short- and long-term research in sport participation in Canada by increasing the funding available through the Insight Grants funding opportunity.

Sport Canada considers for funding applications that propose programs of research relevant to its policy priorities and that SSHRC adjudication committees have recommended for funding, but that, due to budgetary constraints, do not receive an Insight Grant.

Note that the initiative is designed to complement, not replace, existing SSHRC support for sport participation research offered through the Insight program.

Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplements

Applicants for a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship who indicate their interest on the application form and who are working in one or more of the target areas identified below will be considered for a Sport Canada Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplement.

Only applications that are recommended for funding at SSHRC are referred to Sport Canada. Postdoctoral researchers who already hold a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship are ineligible to apply for this supplement. If interested, please contact the Research Training Portfolio.

Doctoral Award Supplements

Applicants for a SSHRC doctoral award who indicate their interest on the application form and who are working in one or more of the target areas identified below will be considered for a Sport Canada Doctoral Award Supplement.

Only applications that are recommended for funding at SSHRC are referred to Sport Canada. Those who already hold a SSHRC doctoral award are ineligible to apply for this supplement. If interested, please contact the Research Training Portfolio.

Target Areas

For all three funding mechanisms—research grants, postdoctoral fellowship supplements, and doctoral award supplements—the SPRI partners invite proposals that address the broad objectives described above and that focus on one or more of the following specific areas of research:

1. Participant development: Research that supports the sound development of athletes, volunteers, coaches, officials and leaders.

Priorities include:

  • physical literacy promotion and awareness;
  • training and retention of volunteers, coaches, officials and leaders;
  • athlete development, retention, services, and talent identification; and
  • athlete outcomes related to long-term athlete development pathways (including those for underrepresented groups and Paralympic athletes).

2. System performance: Research that supports the effective performance of the sport system’s structures, processes and interventions.

Priorities include:

  • effective programming for underrepresented groups and first-contact participants;
  • effective long-term athlete development and pathway-focused programming;
  • organizational capacity, including governance, resources and leadership;
  • collaboration and partnerships;
  • beneficial use of new technologies in support of system performance; and
  • monitoring and evaluation.

3. Values and ethics: Research that supports and/or evaluates/monitors safe, ethical and values-based design and delivery of sport policies, programs and services.

Priorities include:

  • promotion of inclusion and reflection of community diversity;
  • policies and programs related to safety, injury prevention and injury recovery;
  • values-based programming;
  • ethical conduct, practices and behaviours; and
  • unethical conduct, practices and behaviours (especially in the areas of doping, violence, abuse and harassment).

4. Major games and events: Research that analyses impacts on and outcomes for communities and Canadians as legacies (social, cultural, economic) of major games and events.

Priorities include:

  • facilities, venues and spaces;
  • sustainable resources and outcomes; and
  • impacts specific to small-, medium- and large-scale events.

5. Economic and social development: Research that supports sport for development outcomes in Canadian communities.

Priorities include:

  • development of community-based evaluation tools; and
  • collaboration with experts in non-sport fields of development.

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Value and Duration

Research Grants

SPRI Research Grants are available for Insight Grant applications and are worth up to a maximum of $100,000 annually, but not totaling more than $250,000 in a three-year period.

Insight Grant applicants who request funding for up to five years and for more than $250,000 via the Insight Grant application may also be considered for SPRI funding. Those applicants will be requested to resubmit an adjusted three-year budget.

A minimum request of $7,000 is required in at least one year of the project.

Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplements

SPRI Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplements are tenable for 12 months and are worth $10,000, in addition to the annual value of the SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Doctoral Award Supplements

SPRI Doctoral Award Supplements are tenable for 12 months and are worth up to $10,000, in addition to the annual value of the doctoral award.


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Eligibility

In order to be eligible for and maintain SPRI funding, all grant and award holders are expected to meet and follow program funding conditions determined by Sport Canada, in addition to the eligibility requirements outlined below for each specific type of grant or award.

Applications submitted to SSHRC that would be more appropriately evaluated by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council or the Canadian Institutes of Health Research will not be accepted. To determine if your research falls within SSHRC's mandate, please see Subject Matter Eligibility.

Research Grants

Applicants and participants

The SPRI partners invite proposals from individual researchers and research teams affiliated with an eligible Canadian postsecondary institution who are working in Canada in one or more of the target areas of interest.

A researcher currently holding an SPRI grant may not submit a new SPRI application as a principal applicant. A researcher may not submit an application for an SPRI grant and another application for an Insight Grant as a principal applicant in the same competition. All applicants must comply with other SSHRC eligibility criteria for the Insight Grants funding opportunity.

Teams may consist of an applicant (principal investigator / project director) and/or one or more co-applicants (co-investigators) or collaborators.

Institutions

Institutions that propose to administer any grant awarded under this funding opportunity must meet the requirements for managing SSHRC funds and must hold or obtain institutional eligibility.

Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplements

Applicants for a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship who are working in one or more of the target areas of interest, and who are affiliated with an eligible Canadian postsecondary institution, are eligible to apply.

Doctoral Award Supplements

Applicants for a SSHRC doctoral award who are working in one or more of the target areas of interest, and who are affiliated with an eligible Canadian university, are eligible to apply.


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Evaluation and Adjudication

Each application for an SPRI Research Grant is adjudicated first by the relevant SSHRC adjudication committee. Then, if the application is recommended for funding but, due to budgetary constraints, is placed on SSHRC's supplementary list, it is referred to the Sport Canada Relevance Committee.

The Relevance Committee is made up of the Sport Canada research co-ordinator and members of the academic community. This committee assesses whether the research will contribute to efforts to enhance sport participation in Canada. The committee reviews each application and forms a consensus on whether the proposed research adequately meets the funding opportunity's objectives and target areas. To this end, applications must clearly and specifically indicate how the proposed research applies to the Initiative's sport participation objectives.

The SPRI Relevance Committee's decisions cannot be appealed.

In the case of applications for the Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplement and the Doctoral Award Supplement, the procedure is similar. The significant difference is that the postdoctoral fellowship and doctoral award adjudication committees will only refer successful applications to the Sport Canada Relevance Committee.

SPRI adjudication timelines

Funding opportunity Review by SSHRC adjudication committees Relevance review by Sport Canada Results announced SPRI grant/award start date
Insight Grants March 2016 June 2016 July 2016 January 2017
SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowships December 2015
Doctoral Awards March 2016

Conditions of Funding

In order to receive and maintain eligibility for an SPRI grant or award, applicants must meet the following criteria:

  1. The proposed research must meet the SPRI objectives on sport participation and have a focus on one or more of the target areas of research.

  2. During the life of their grant and until the end of their research projects, grant and award holders must participate in the annual Sport Canada Research Initiative conference in Ottawa, to which they will be invited by Sport Canada. SPRI funding includes costs related to travel to the conference. Therefore, applicants must include costs related to attendance at the conference as part of their research proposal's budget.

  3. As part of the knowledge transfer component of the SPRI funding, grant and award holders will be required to prepare a short paper targeted at the sport policy and practitioner communities, summarizing the key findings of their research. The deadline for the submission of these knowledge transfer materials is September 30 of the final year of the grant. Sport Canada will contact grant and award holders at their funding end date to communicate the due date and SPRI knowledge transfer guidelines. Grant and award holders will be asked to follow the knowledge transfer template provided by Sport Canada in preparing their paper. Grant and award holders are encouraged to seek publication of their paper in an open source publication.

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Regulations, Policies, and Related Information

For descriptions of SSHRC terms, see Definitions of Terms.

Research Grants

All applicants and grant holders must comply with the Regulations Governing Grant Applications and with the regulations set out in the Tri-Agency Financial Administration Guide.

Postdoctoral Fellowship and Doctoral Award Supplements

All fellowship and scholarship applicants and holders must comply with the Regulations Governing Fellowship and Scholarship Applications and with the regulations set out in the appropriate Award Holder's Guide.


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Contact Information

For more information about the SPRI, please contact:

Chantal Meda
Program Officer
Research Grants and Partnerships Division
SSHRC
350 Albert Street
P.O. Box 1610
Ottawa, ON  K1P 6G4
Tel.: 613-947-2094
Fax: 613-992-7635
Email: chantal.meda@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca

Joanne Kay
Senior Research and Policy Analyst
Policy and Planning
Sport Canada
15 Eddy Street, 16th Floor
Gatineau, QC  K1A 0M5
Tel.: 613-294-3036
Fax: 514-939-1918
Email: joanne.kay@pch.gc.ca
www.canadianheritage.gc.ca